Let’s take a closer look at the ending of the film, which closely follows the end of the novel, so that everyone can understand, for once and for all, that the film is a satire and …

The ending of American Psycho makes it clear that none of the violence was real, and that Patrick Bateman (the protagonist) never actually hurt anybody, but instead was dreaming of a way out of his mundane consumerist existence. The Ending, Explained.

We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us. American Psycho (film) Mary Harron. Like the Bret Easton Ellis book that it's based on, the ending of Mary Harron's American Psycho is rather ambiguous, and has been a source of debate amongst fans for a long time. Because of the above I read into it that the narrative of American Psycho is a personal Hell for Patrick Bateman. The final words are an acknowledgement of how he is constantly in pain because search as he may for a release or resolution to how he feels, he cannot find one. What I consider the ending of ‘American Psycho’ is the point in the film when our unlikely protagonist’s world starts falling apart, quite literally, and like in Nolan’s ‘Inception’, the highly fragile “dream” world that Patrick Bateman (played by a devilishly feisty Christian Bale) built begins collapsing. Some people think it was all a fantasy. Before you might begin to draw any ideas from the comparison I just made, I will … The American Psycho ending has confounded viewers of the film for 20 years. Like the Bret Easton Ellis novel that inspired it, the film leaves open the possibility that Patrick Bateman didn’t really kill all those people. Release Date January 1, 2000. ... American Psycho: “You like Huey Lewis and the News?” "American Psycho - Ending Scene" Track Info.